Category Archives: WSB

Death star 2

I’m overdue to write something nice about WSB.

Jeff Dore's workplace ID badge

Jeff Dore’s workplace ID badge

This occurred to me as I was attending the sendoff the station threw for Jeff Dore, purportedly the first-ever WSB general assignment reporter to retire from the station. If that raises an eyebrow, that’s on you.  I’m being nice.

Here’s the biggest compliment I can give to the station against whom I’ve competed for the last 28 years:  I almost never hear its employees gripe about their workplace.  (There’s one notable exception, but it dates to 2006.)

And they could.  WSB’s dayside reporters have to run a gauntlet of hour-long newscasts at noon, 4, 5 and 6pm.  Except for the folks enterprising investigative stuff, reporters typically have to deliver material for at least two of those newscasts each day.  It has the schedule of a sweat shop.

(My favorite thing to see is when John Bachman covers a story during the day, then anchors their 4pm newscast, then gets shoved out the door in rush hour traffic to do a live shot at 6 on the story he’d covered previously.  4pm co-anchor Erin Coleman gets the same inglorious treatment.  You kids in college want to be news anchors?  Talk to those two first.)

Bachman and I cover some dreary meeting related to the new Falcons stadium, Nov. 2012

Bachman and I cover some dreary meeting related to the new Falcons stadium, Nov. 2012

Yet the affable Bachman, whose daddy is a recently-retired longtime anchor at WHO-TV in Des Moines Iowa, is the embodiment of a WSB employee who has no gripes.

The station’s esprit de corps was evident at Dore’s function.  The event’s energy emanated from the troops, not the station’s management (which had sprung for the tab and food at Uncle Julio’s on Peachtree Rd.)

From my view across the proverbial street (a viewpoint from which I am committed to the righteous cause of strengthening WXIA and crushing WSB), here are some notes on my grudging admiration for my doomed competitor.

Although they work their field hands pretty hard, there’s no ambivalence about their expectations.  You’ll produce pieces for two or more newscasts each day. You will be in a live truck.  And you won’t let one of those other Atlanta TV stations yapping at your heels beat you on a story.

Even if you’re sent on some meaningless “breaking news,” you’ll sell it as such because it is happening now.  You’d best get those flashing lights and / or crime scene tape behind you in your live shot.

Your photogs will take their cameras off their tripods during live shots, and you will gesture emphatically toward whatever building or other mise en scene is behind you.  Or you’ll display a piece of paper held in your hand or some other prop.

In return, you’ll be the best-compensated local news crews in town.  You’ll have ample benefits and vacation time.

You’ll have an abundance of competent backup in a newsroom that has mostly retained the type of employees downsized from other newsrooms.

You’ll use gear that is well-maintained and will never fail you due to neglect or budgetary issues.  As a result, you will rarely waste time wrestling with issues that aren’t related to covering news.

You’ll not be saddled with gimmickry or efforts to re-invent your craft.  You’ll use video, words, audio and graphics to efficiently and clearly tell your stories, same as you always have.

If there are updates in technology, you’ll have them before anybody else. (Except for HD video in the field.  But while HD looks better on TV, the standard def video you’ve been using is easier to work with, uses less hard drive space and is faster to process.  So your delay was worker-friendly.  And your vast audience never really noticed nor cared that the other stations used HD first.)

Mike Dreadan

Mike Dreadan

You’ll work for managers you respect.  Your news director, Mike Dreaden, is a guy who came up through the ranks.  When I’ve heard WSB personnel utter his name in the field, it has always been in respectful tones.  The evidence indicates he possesses a functioning human heart.

And you’ll do all this for an audience that seemingly can’t get enough of your product.

I’ve written a thing or two that have challenged my friends at WSB, mostly about their attitude and their priorities.  I stand by it.  But their work is solid.  And as local TV stations go, it appears to be a quality place of employment.

They’ll miss Dore.  He was unfailingly great to be around in the field.  He was a graceful and humorous storyteller in a shop that tends to be very nuts-and-bolts.  But they’ve managed to succeed in Monica’s absence.  Dore would be the first to tell you that they’ll do OK without him.

So here’s my slow hand-clap for WSB.  You guys aren’t half bad.

And we will bury you.

Holiday sampler

It’s Presidents Day.  For most of you, it marks the start of a shortened work week.  Mine will be a six-day work week.  My coworkers will experience the same thing.  This will be the second of three six-day work weeks for us.

It’s been foreordained for months.  WXIA is carrying the winter Olympics, a wildly popular TV event.  Our news operation gets a spike in viewership whenever the Olympics airs.  Erego, our staff is asked to bust its hump to show these viewers what we can do.

Paul Crawley and a sheet of ice

Paul Crawley and a sheet of ice

The timing of this particular six-day work week is noteworthy (actually, “brutal” is the correct word), given the workload of the previous week.  For most of last week, much of our staff worked 12-18 hour days and never went home because of the round-the-clock coverage we gave to the ice storm that struck north Georgia.  I spent two nights away from the family and sweet-talked my way out of a third.

It really struck me when I turned on the TV Sunday and saw Paul Crawley covering some sort of mayhem.  Crawley was an animal during our 24 hour coverage; it seemed like he was on TV constantly, describing ad infinitum the snow and ice he encountered in Cobb County on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Crawley got a one-day weekend after that, like the rest of us.

So here’s why I’m not complaining.

My workplace is in a dogfight to remain competitive and relevant and to win the hearts and minds of viewers and web users as news consumption habits change.

This is further aggravated by the fact that one Atlanta TV station, WSB, has been wildly successful at all-but cornering the market and hoarding the ratings.  To its credit, WSB appears to have plowed its profits back into its news operation.  They’ve hired talented staff.  They pay them well.  They have lots of up-to-date gear, and they keep it in good working order.  Despite some hubris that comes with being at the top of the heap, they do good work and are a formidable presence.

During the Olympics, many of their viewers keep their TVs somewhat locked on WXIA.  When our newscast shows up following Olympic coverage, our job is to keep those viewers’ brains from firing the synapses required to pick up their clickers and switch the channel or shut down the TV set.

The overnight ratings show that we are somewhat successful in this venture.  The goal is to seduce those viewers into enjoying a fulfilling, long-term relationship with our news operation.

We’ve tried this previously.  We had the same ratings spikes during the 2012 summer Olympics.  When the games ended, our gains were largely temporary.

So why do it again?  Because we can’t afford not to.  Plus, our product is worth showcasing.  There’s no better newsman in town than Paul Crawley.  It’s high time some of those habitual WSB viewers, watching WXIA on a Sunday, noticed that.

The dogfight to which I referred earlier is quite real.   Behind WSB, there are three other stations clumped together, stepping on each other’s heads to try to become the most viable alternative.  The one that fails most could become the first local news operation in town to just go away completely.

Crawley's "storm chaser" is the one on the right.

WXIA’s “storm chaser” is the one on the right.

My boss, Ellen Crooke, has been struggling for six years to make WXIA the top alternative to WSB.  She is sharp, energetic and creative and can be a little off-the-wall.  She is pursuing this goal with one hand tied behind her back; her budget is a fraction of WSB’s, and she can’t do a damned thing about that.

Yet she doesn’t give up — which would be easy to do, given the stubbornness of Atlanta news viewers to stick with WSB.

So when there are fresh eyeballs glued to WXIA, and she asks me to work a bit harder, my response is:  Yes ma’am.  It’s not just because I need to stay in her good graces.  It’s because I want my employer to survive.  If it could also thrive, that would be a nice bonus.

Here’s hoping you’re enjoying your Presidents Day holiday, and WXIA’s Olympics coverage.  And here’s hoping you’ll stick around for the A-block of our newscast.  You might actually like what you see.  And change your viewing habits, already!  Geez.

Finger pointing

AJC photo by Ben Gray

AJC photo by Ben Gray

On behalf of the Atlanta media, I’d like to thank you for not blaming us for the slow response to the Tuesday storm we’ll call Gridlockalypse 2014.  Because one could argue that you could.

Chesley McNeal delivers the Winter Storm Warning on WXIA's 4am news Tuesday

Chesley McNeal delivers the Winter Storm Warning on WXIA’s 4am news Tuesday

No, the blame rests with the government officials who failed to heed the hue and cry we raised Tuesday morning, when the National Weather Service issued a Winter Storm Warning at 3:39am.

That’s the technicality that lets us off the hook.

Here’s the reality:  The Atlanta news media — especially TV — likes nothing more than to raise a hue and cry about upcoming “weather events.”  And it doesn’t take a Winter Storm Warning to prompt it.  We get excited about Winter Weather Advisories, Winter Storm Watches, Severe Thunderstorm Watches, and Heat Advisories.  We get geeked when the temperature drops below freezing.

There’s a reason for that.  The audience actually turns on local TV news when they think the weather is getting bad.  It’s measurable.  And we are always happy to welcome our larger audience with hearty doses of the information they seek.

Whenever it happens, we are utterly truthful with the details. If the NWS has issued a Winter Storm Watch and not a warning, we’ll say that — over and over and over again, while producing  perilous-looking color schemes moving ominously across maps.

The problem, one could argue, is that we lack proportion.  We beat the weather drum with great urgency.  We put human beings — “team coverage!” — in the elements to add a measure of performance art to the story.  Residents of Carrollton are bracing for the line of thunderstorms that’s expected here any minute.  As you can see, the wind is starting to pick up and the sky is darkening…

It may not be apocalyptic, but it sure seems that way.

Gov. Nathan Deal

Gov. Nathan Deal

Can you blame state officials for failing to discern that the real thing was advancing upon us Tuesday?

Technically, you can.  A Winter Storm Warning means that a winter storm is “imminent or occurring.” The word “warning” is always the key when attuned to NWS information.

But what if TV and radio routinely makes it sound like the bogeyman is about to get you?  It is up to you, dear viewer, to know the difference.  Sometimes, we just give you information that merely sounds really, really urgent.  And other times, you need to react by closing schools and staying off the roads.  (But by all means, go purchase some bread and milk first, and be sure to say hi to our highly trained journalist stationed live outside your grocery store.)

Meantime, you’ve got political appointees running agencies like the Department of Transportation and the Georgia Emergency Management Agency who are supposed to discern the subtle differences between our usual weather drumbeat, and the real deal.

So yes:  An alarm should go off in GEMA whenever the NWS issues a Winter Storm Warning.  That’s a tangible signal that our routine drumbeat of weather coverage has flipped into something genuinely noteworthy, and its time to activate Georgia’s paltry fleet of salt trucks.

Likewise, it would have been unseemly for Mayor Kasim Reed and Gov. Nathan Deal to point back at the news media and say “it’d help if y’all only got excited about serious weather.  Because it’s kind of hard to tell when it’s really getting dangerous, or whether it’s just y’all trying to excite the audience and keep them tuned into your TV station.”

That would have been petty.  But it would have been an interesting conversation starter.

Sources

Geary, left, and James

Geary, left, and James

Thursday a local district attorney outed a couple of his former employees as the sources of leaks during a couple of high-profile investigations.  The DA was under oath, testifying in a pretrial hearing in one of those cases.

The DA was Robert James of DeKalb County.  The employees, he said, were his former chief assistant DA Don Geary, and John Melvin, who worked closely with Geary.  The testimony explained some WSB-TV scoops that puzzled the rest of the market and perplexed some in the legal community.

First, the scoops were great.  Amazing, actually.  In August 2012, on the same day Andrea Sneiderman was indicted for murder, investigators went to her parents’ home on Lake Oconee and arrested her.  Somebody tipped off WSB – not only to the pending indictment, but also to the arrest.  WSB (and the cojoined AJC) had the correct address of the lake house, and a photographer was positioned to shoot video of Mrs. Sneiderman getting taken into custody.

The Sneiderman arrest. AJC photo

The Sneiderman arrest. AJC photo

The presence of “the media” at Mrs. Sneiderman’s arrest became a rallying cry for her defense team.  It showed, they said, that the prosecution was vindictive – and overreaching (the DA dropped the murder charge on the eve of Mrs. Sneiderman’s trial).  Defense attorneys said they had pleaded with the DA to allow them to arrange a low-key surrender of Mrs. Sneiderman in the event of an indictment.  Instead, the DA went for what turned out to be a flashy arrest.

Wish I’d gotten the tip.  I’d have done the same thing.

The same day, WSB reporter Jodie Fleischer reported details of the indictment during a noon live shot.  The indictment hadn’t yet been officially filed in the Superior Court clerk’s office, which makes it public record.  Somebody leaked it to Fleischer.

The rest of us knew the indictment was pending but didn’t have a copy.  During his testimony last week, James said he deduced that Fleischer got the leaked indictment info from Melvin, because the copy she had was identical to a copy Melvin had before the indictment was revised.  (In the courthouse media room last week, Fleischer disputed that, saying she had a copy of the revised indictment, identical to the one certified in the clerk’s office.)

Fleischer - from her Twitter page

Fleischer – from her Twitter page

Fleischer’s name came up several times during James’ testimony.  James said Melvin and Geary had “a relationship” with the WSB reporter.  That may sound like more than it really is.  Reporters develop relationships with sources and they’re based mostly on mutual trust.

James also talked about the indictment of Ellis, and the fact that a WSB photographer was waiting at Ellis’s house when the DA’s office executed a search warrant there.  When he realized “the media” had been tipped off, James testified that he tried unsuccessfully to warn Ellis and postpone the search.

James said he confronted Melvin and Geary about the leaks.  James said both men denied being Fleischer’s source.

Both men quit the DA’s office in 2012.  After they quit, James said, “the leaks stopped.”

I didn’t ask Fleischer if the story James told under oath was correct.  I wouldn’t have answered such a question and I wouldn’t have expected her too, either.

It’s worth noting that prosecutors didn’t question Geary and Melvin about it while they were under oath.  Good call.

Scoops get noticed inside newsrooms but rarely outside them.  The moment of triumph that accompanies them rarely last much longer than a moment.  But these were different — especially the Sneiderman indictment, because the info came from inside a “secret” grand jury proceeding.

Sources depend on reporters to keep their names under wraps — and Fleischer undoubtedly upheld her end of the deal.  But here’s a tip for those inclined to discreetly help their friends in the media:  Try to be a little less obvious than Geary and / or Melvin might have been.

And call me next time!

This post has been updated to correct the description of Fleischer’s noon live shot, which did not include actual paperwork from the indictment.

Extracurricular

anchorman-2-poster-will-ferrell-ron-burgundyThe biggest cinema event in Atlanta TV news will premiere some time next month.  I’m anticipating Anchorman 2 with a mixture of anticipation and dread.  On one hand, Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy was the most important movie ever made about local TV news.  Based on that alone, the sequel is worth anticipating.  On the other hand, there will inevitably be recycled jokes.  The Hangover 2 was a godawful sequel to a fine lowbrow comedy.  Anchorman 2 has potential for similar wretchedness.

But  — it was filmed in Atlanta.  One suspects there will be cameo appearances by local news folk.  I’ve heard no scuttlebutt of any appearances from any personnel from my station; I’m rooting for the other non-WSB stations to have some placement in the movie.  If there’s going to be anybody in it from WSB, I’m rooting, of course, for Mark Winne in a trench coat.

The producers of the movie did not call me, unfortunately (and I failed to make any effort to reach out them).  My appearances in Squidbillies should have had them hot on my heels.  Apparently, my ability to churn other peoples’ comedic material in cartoon voiceover never got on their radar.

Early Cuyler

Early Cuyler

Next week I’m due to do a voiceover for my fourth Squidbillies episode.  This appears to be making me into a bona fide recurring role.  In each episode, I’ve played “Doug Richards,” a reporter appearing on TV within a graphics package that looks remarkably like WXIA’s.

My acting skills are clearly limited.  I suspect they feel they’re kinda stuck with me though, given that they’ve already got a template for my caricature.  Plus, they work with my wife.

120816123554_doug_20on_20squids_0My character is a plot device.  So far, he’s been called upon to

  • report on a crime spree by the main character;
  • report on a north Georgia cave that seemed to alter the theory of evolution;
  • report on the Atlanta Pride parade (mistaken by the main character, Early Cuyler, as a parade devoted to country music legend Charley Pride);
  • report on (fill in the blank.  They haven’t sent me the script for next week’s taping yet.)

So I won’t be in Anchorman 2.  But I will be in Squidbillies, season nine, episode TBD — assuming my boss OKs the script, and I make the episode’s final edit.

As an aside, can we get the guy who does the voice of Dan Halen to cut some news promos on some Atlanta station please?

In other news, an Atlanta radio show sampled a story I produced last week and put it in a song.  I didn’t even know those guys were still on the radio.

Meantime — one of my coworkers shows up in a ten-frame Daily Show cameo, and the flicker of hope remains kindled for yours truly.

The booming voice

It was fun competing against Ron Sailor, the TV reporter – turned – preacher who died last week at age 61. Sailor and I worked nightside, which meant we frequently ended up crowding around the same story. Sailor was always the loudest guy in the vicinity — not because he was a loudmouth. He just had a booming, bass voice that I heard nightly for years.

Ron Sailor - AJC photo

Ron Sailor – AJC photo

On numerous occasions, we’d find ourselves at the old APD Homicide Task Force office on Somerset  Terrace. There was plenty of room in front of the building, but photogs always liked to crowd competing reporters together into a tight space — a subtly sadistic twist exacerbated when Sailor was part of the equation. Not only was he loud, he was a man of some size. Because TV newscast producers are part of a grand media conspiracy, Sailor’s stories on WSB (and later WXIA), and mine on WAGA would frequently pop up at exactly the same time during the half-hour 11pm newscast.

This meant Sailor and I would start delivering our live reports at exactly the same time. It would take all the concentration I could muster to ignore his booming voice while I feebly attempted to make mine heard.

Once, Sailor and former mayor Andy Young spent a night or three on Atlanta’s streets, producing a report that sought to give insight into Atlanta’s homeless population. Young and Sailor donned skullies and thrift-store clothing and reported that they, too, were shunned or abused by folks downtown who’d mistaken them for homeless people.

I read about it in the AJC, and wished I’d done it. In 1996, I kinda did the same thing during the Olympics. It was a total ripoff of what Ron Sailor had done.

The last time I saw Sailor, I was knocking on his door because he’d become part of some unflattering story involving his finances; there had been allegations he had grifted some folk. We were giving Sailor celebrity treatment on a story that was otherwise really nobody’s business. I went to his door sans camera, unwilling to bum-rush the guy. He answered graciously, declined comment and we left.

Since then, I’d seen him do Wayfield Foods commercials and heard about his career as a preacher. I’d read about the issues his sons faced — one, as a disgraced former legislator, the other as a man convicted of murdering his girlfriend.

I was a green newcomer to Atlanta when I became Ron Sailor’s competitor. He was always friendly, willing to share his experience and seemed to know what he was doing. At age 61, he died too young.

Why WSB makes me puke

What follows is petty, childish and very likely, unfair.  It reflects chatter I’ve overheard in the last few years among colleagues and competitors — the ones who don’t work at WSB, of course.  It fails to fully reflect my respect and affection for many of the hard-working men and women who work at WSB  — including the individual whose Twitter bio is described below.

cox-wirelessI root for media companies that produce local newspapers, host local television stations and pay people to produce quality journalism.

Cox Enterprises does all those things.  But Cox disgusts me.  In particular, its Atlanta properties make me want to puke.

I write this as a competitor and as a consumer of its product.  I have sunk many of my American dollars into its coffers.  I have subscribed non-stop to the Cox-owned Atlanta newspaper since 1986 and still fetch a copy of the AJC from my driveway seven days a week.  (I still prefer “Covers Dixie Like the Dew” to “Credible. Compelling. Complete.”  Barf.)

So I’ve been a small-scale stakeholder in the many rises and falls of the AJC.  When the economy (and Craigslist) sent it into the crapper in 2008, I grieved.  I rooted for the newspaper to stay relevant and profitable.  I don’t know how profitable it is, but I like what I read many mornings.  It does more with less, yet it has re-emerged as the best government watchdog in town.

So why the nausea?wsb013

Very simply, it’s the chest-beating.  Every single time the newspaper produces a story about the Atlanta Public Schools scandal, it includes a box that informs the reader that the AJC broke the story and has followed the story at every step.  Every word is true.  The AJC did great work sizing up the test scores and bringing the scandal to light.

And I’m OK with some chest-beating.  All news organizations do it.  But the AJC never passes up an opportunity to do it on countless stories.  Its putrid feedback loop of endless self-congratulation and self-promotion makes me want to hurl.  Lord knows how bad it would be if the AJC had won the Pulitzer it undoubtedly craved for APS story.

This is in stark comparison to the pre-2008 AJC that carefully and almost painfully separated its marketing from its editorial content.  We’ll let local TV sully itself with that, you could almost hear them saying on Marietta St.  How things have changed.  Even its Sunday editorial page column by Kevin Riley or whomever, wherein the boss purports to bring transparency to the newsgathering process, ends up being a predictable exercise in chest-beating.  Barf.

Maybe WSB-TV is as self-congratulatory as its “partner” in Cox crime, the AJC.  However, self-promotion has been part of the TV news game since forever.  TV is competitive.  The AJC is the only game in town, newspaper-wise.  So TV chest-beating is more defensible than the AJC’s.

But has there ever been a TV news promo more putrid than this one?

When a gunman burst into a local school, he forced an administrator to call our newsroom! “He said he wants me to give a message to channel two.”  Channel two Action News heard his demands — and the gunshots.  We broke the news!

First of all, let SpaceyG shed a little light on this:  The gunman “told me to call one of the news stations. But I asked him which one, it was so many. And he said, ‘I don’t care. Just call one!’” according to WSB’s own interview with the administrator, Antoinette Tuff, who indicated WSB’s number popped up on a Google search of Atlanta TV stations.

But aside from that, here’s WSB’s message:  Hostage-holding, school-invading gunmen love them some channel two action news!  And so should you.

All together now:  Barf.

WSB’s putridness is frequently personified nowadays by its crews in the field.

The only station that matters

The only station that matters

Used to be, WSB’s field hands shat stinky shit like the rest of us.  For many years, they toiled in a flawed, thankless business like everybody else grinding out local TV news, working small miracles on ridiculous deadlines.  I’m sure they still do that.  They have a 4pm deadline, for crissakes.

But many of their crews are now believing their own press, the one that begins with a banner in their newsroom that says “#1 News Team in America.”  Too many of them bring an air of laughable pomposity to the field, like the best athlete at a crappy college who forgets he’s not playing in the NFL.  Hey WSB:  You’re still covering traffic wrecks and apartment fires for the local friggin news.

One need look no further than everybody’s favorite WSB reporter, Mark Winne.  Go to his Twitter page, and he describes himself, in part:  “…TV reporter at #1 major market station in America. Priorities: God, Family, Truth for our viewers…”  Barf.

Even their interns make me puke.  Who was that heavily made-up blonde driving a baby-blue Hummer to assignments this summer?  Barf.

Humbler times:  Ray Moore, WSB

Humbler times: Ray Moore, WSB

One evening at a local watering hole, I made unexpected smalltalk with a WSB manager.  I casually remarked about “worrying about ratings.”  The retort:  “We don’t worry about ratings anymore,” the manager sniffed. “Except by comparison with other stations across the country.  Nowadays, we consider WPVI (a wildly popular Philadelphia station) our competitor.”  But not the Atlanta stations.

Barf.

Every word was true, I’m sure.  WSB’s ratings are titanic.  And I will admit:  They do a good job of blanketing metro Atlanta.  They have more crews in the field than the rest of us. Their field hands work hard.  They doggedly uncover fresh elements to ongoing stories.  They’re enterprising and they’re tough.

Except for WGCL, all the Atlanta TV stations started in the same place.  WSB has covered news well and marketed themselves well.  They have ascended to the top of the Atlanta market through hard work and skill and a bit of help from ABC. I admire that about them.

I remain a huge fan of many of the individuals I see working at WSB.  Fortunately, there remains a strong contingent of their staff who take the station’s success with an appropriate measure of humility.

I would even admit to a bit of envy when I see their ability to deploy resources and technology that I may lack when trying to cover the same story.cow-face

But you’re still covering the same story as me.  And your shit smells no better now than it did twenty years ago.

WSB’s stock in trade is still covering meatball news, the grinding metro mayhem that makes local news unwatchable except as spectacle.  (Whenever the AJC needs a mayhem quote, the newspaper nearly always references its source as “channel 2 action news.”)   And they process it with little storytelling nuance, laced with much grab-the-audience-by-the-throat hype.

WSB has the subtlety of a sledgehammer.  Yet it’s that blunt force that makes them who they are.

And like a cow gobbling up her placenta after birthing a calf, the TV audience eats it up.   So yeah — it’s y’all’s damn fault.

Barf.

Tell it to the judge

Judge Gregory Adams is bored by WXIA's Doug Richards and WSB photographer Tony Light.

Judge Gregory Adams is bored by WXIA’s Doug Richards and WSB photographer Tony Light.

“I’d like to see the representatives of the news media at the bench now.” The reporter from WXIA and the photog from WSB marched forward.  “You’re going to jail!” whispered one of the lawyers as we passed the defense table.

“Why are you treating the perjury trial of Andrea Sneiderman like it’s the trial of the century?”

Judge Gregory Adams didn’t actually ask this question.  But it’s more interesting than the one he actually asked.  Here are four answers.  As if you didn’t already know.

The love triangle.  Maybe there was, maybe there wasn’t.  But the admitted killer, Hemy Neuman, was clearly sweet on his victim’s wife.  She’s now accused of covering up for him.

The defendant’s testimony.  Her testimony in Neuman’s trial was remarkable.  She may be a grieving widow, victimized by an obsessed coworker.  But her account of events was contradicted just enough to raise questions.  This trial will be viewed through the prism of that testimony.  Her attorneys won’t let her anywhere near the witness stand again.

The dropped murder charges.  The prosecution lost its nerve, dropping the biggest charge against the defendant at the last minute.  How strong is the remaining case?   As sheer spectacle, the DA is now as much under the spotlight as the defendant.

It’s August.  It’s usually a slow month in the news biz.  But not this August.  Thank you, Judge Adams, for your scheduling — and for not sending T. Light and me to the lockup.

Crime of fashion

A series of bad decisions led a 20 year old named Elijah Freeman to this:  Handcuffed, seated in the back of a Clayton County police car, wearing a t-shirt and boxer shorts.  Police had told us that the alleged carjacker was about to get walked into police headquarters.

I had arrived at Clayton County police headquarters to talk to the PIO about another story.  Moments before we arrived, Mr. Freeman  had crashed the car he’d allegedly carjacked into the front lawn of police headquarters.  Tom Jones of WSB was also there for the same reason.

Elijah Freeman wears cuffs but no pants.

Elijah Freeman wears cuffs but no pants.

I saw Freeman in the patrol car.  Occasionally, the cops let him out of the car as they talked, and as crime scene techs snapped photos.  I was struck by Freeman’s absence of pants, and quickly deduced the reason:  Freeman was a devotee of a style of fashion derisively known as pants on the ground.

At one point, a crime scene photographer bent over a pair of pants crumpled on the ground nearby, documenting the evidence.

“The suspect ran out of his pants,” a police major confirmed in an interview, efforting a straight face.  As in:  The pants fell off as the bad guy tried to run, slowing him in his losing foot race with pursuing cops.

An arguably poor fashion decision was a crimestopper on this day.  That, and the force of gravity.

I am pretty broadminded about fashion and music and culture, but I completely do not get pants on the ground.  I find it odd that young men, most of them African American, appear to believe that it’s attractive to have the waist band of their pants lingering midway or below the gluteus maximus, such that they must struggle to walk by using a free hand to prevent the pants from falling to their ankles.

You’re just old and white, Doug.  Maybe that’s it.

Yet if you’re running from the cops, this fashion choice can complicate things considerably.

The patrol car drove up to an entrance.  Freeman was in the back.  Jones and I waited.  (Watch the perp walk here.)

Did you carjack that woman?  Jones got the first question.  I respect the fact that Jones “owns” Clayton County, news-wise.  He does great work there.

My turn:  Any regrets about today, Elijah?  My question was more open-ended, but Freeman wasn’t talking.

What happened to your pants, Elijah?!  Jones went straight to the top-of-mind question, knowing a response wasn’t likely.

The perp walk lasted all of twenty seconds.  As Freeman approached the door, I moved in front of him for one last, futile question:  Do you wish you had worn better-fitting pants today?

Silence.  Then Freeman disappeared into the cop shop.

Considering that this man was accused of carjacking a woman at gunpoint, the questions about his pants may have seemed superfluous.  On the other hand, he’d clearly showed a disinclination to answer questions about the crime.

It’s too bad he didn’t answer the pants-on-the-ground questions.  It might have helped clear up something that continues to mystify this old guy.

The shallow end of the pool

I was all set to boldly urge a little jail time for the news director at WSB-TV.  The contention would have been that the TV station flagrantly violated a court order Friday March 29, the day the Fulton County grand jury indicted 35 people in connection with the Atlanta Public Schools cheating scandal.

This was the violation:  WSB’s exclusive use of court-ordered pool video in its newscast without first distributing the video to the other Atlanta TV stations who were part of the pool.

The blurry images of WSB's pool photog, WAGA's Justin Gray, WXIA's Donna Lowry and WGCL's

The blurry images of WSB’s pool photog, WAGA’s Justin Gray, WXIA’s Donna Lowry, WGCL’s Sonia Moghe, WSB radio’s Pete Combs, and WXIA’s Blayne Alexander

The video was short but significant.  It showed a Fulton County sheriff’s deputy walking out the door of the district attorney’s office, carrying a hundred-or-so page indictment.  He then exited the DA’s lobby and headed to the courtroom of Superior Court judge T. Jackson Bedford, who was due to give the indictment his blessing before it would get certified by the court clerk.  The video — and a news conference a few minutes later — culminated a three-day stakeout of the grand jury.

Per an order issued by Judge Bedford under Rule 22 of the Electronic and Photographic News Coverage of Judicial Proceedings in the Uniform Superior Court Rules, WSB was named as the pool camera in the stakeout.  This meant the video belonged to all the TV stations present at the stakeout.

I’ll again note the absurdity of using Rule 22 to cover a stakeout in an office lobby; Rule 22 covers “official court proceedings,” but the Fulton County sheriff and courts have broadened it so that a Rule 22 form, signed by a judge, is required almost anytime a commercial TV camera enters the Fulton County Courthouse.   Since I’m not calling for the jailing of WSB’s news director for violating Rule 22, I’ll gently avoid demanding an adjoining cell for Sheriff Ted Jackson for abusing the rule.

Back to the video of the deputy carrying the indictment:

Reps from all three of WSB’s TV competitors watched WSB’s pool photographer shoot it.  I shot a perfectly lousy Iphone photo of it at 4:57pm.

The only station that matters

The only station that matters, apparently

WSB aired the video at 5:31, perhaps even earlier.

A few minutes later, a WXIA producer asked me about the video she’d seen on WSB.  “You don’t already have it?” I asked her.

Oopsie!  Golly, did we forget to distribute the video to the TV stations who don’t call themselves “the number one news team in America”?

Actually, WSB didn’t overlook it.  WXIA’s desk made repeated calls to WSB to distribute the video.  WSB’s desk apparently questioned whether the video was pool video, then dragged its feet getting the right  answer.  The station finally distributed the video well after 7pm, when most early evening newscasts were done.

Rule 22 states that “approval … shall be granted without partiality or preference to any person, news agency, or type of electronic or photographic coverage…”  In this instance, WSB clearly exercised “partiality” to itself by failing to distribute the pool video before airing it.

WSB's exclusive pool video

WSB’s exclusive pool video

Rule 22 does not set out how pool video will be distributed.  “Photographers, electronic reporters and technicians shall be expected to arrange among themselves pooled coverage…”  TV stations don’t “arrange” pool coverage on a case-by-case basis.  Instead, they rely on a sensible and time-honored arrangement:  Until the pool station distributes its video, the station that shoots it can’t broadcast it.

It presumes that TV stations can behave honorably and not like children.  This isn’t as hilarious as it sounds.  Every pool photographer I’ve worked with at WXIA and WAGA honored the principle that pool video could not air on the pool camera’s station until after every station received it.  WSB photogs also reliably honor that tradition.

Somehow, WSB decided to be dishonorable Friday, ignoring the “no partiality” clause in Rule 22.  And ignoring the what goes around, comes around concept that really drives the rules behind pool video.  All for a 15 second shot.

Superior Court Judge Jackson Bedford

Superior Court Judge Jackson Bedford

It would make perfect sense for Judge Bedford to hold a hearing and demand an explanation from WSB’s news director.   Bedford is a tough guy, especially with the news media.  He can be a bit scary when he’s angry.  A hearing would likely deter such behavior going forward.

However, Fulton County’s courts are pretty clogged with serious criminal cases.  And another Superior Court judge tells me that jail time — even a few hours in a holding cell, like the one that held Beverly Hall — is unlikely in a civil contempt case.  So, I wouldn’t ask Bedford to spend his valuable time on this.

Which leaves us with the concept of honor.  Or the lack thereof at WSB.