OK, it’s a state — but really, what’s the deal with Hawaii?

hawaiiIf this is true, then Lord help the AJC.

Plenty of good staffers took bailouts.  A few good staffers stayed on.  And then, if you believe Gawker, you have the reporter who stayed on, but can’t grasp why a guy born in the state of Hawaii might be eligible to be president.  Even worse, you have the (same) reporter who can’t grasp that “birthers” are disputing Barack Obama’s legitimacy because he was (supposedly) born someplace other than Hawaii.

If you read today’s AJC, you may have seen the story about the Army Major at Ft. Benning who filed a federal lawsuit claiming his deployment is unlawful because the Commander-in-Chief ain’t really that.

Gawker has the rest of the story, believe it or not (and read the comments, which are mostly hilarious).  Today’s lesson for reporters:  Be careful what you Tweet, especially if your fundamental grasp of civics is a little iffy.  And yes, there are stupid questions.


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About live apt fire

Doug Richards is a reporter at WXIA-TV. This is his personal blog. WXIA-TV has nothing whatsoever to do with this blog, under any circumstances, in any form. For anything written herein, Doug accepts sole credit and full blame. Follow him on Twitter: @richardsdoug. All rights reserved. Thanks for visiting.

13 thoughts on “OK, it’s a state — but really, what’s the deal with Hawaii?

  1. Snozz

    Oh, but it gets worse- so many capable journalists let go, and our girl? A NEW HIRE!

    She Tweeted she was working on her 1st story June 10- 4 sentences- “Britney’s Web site says tour returning to Atlanta”.

    Best verbage from her Obama/citizen article: “…he was is not a natural-born…”.
    The article itself is basically a re-write, so in addition to “the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported” we get a “… told the Ledger-Enquirer” and 4 “the paper reported”s.

    Sadly she just sort of tossed off the fact that Cook submitted a formal request to go to Afghanistan just two months ago. For me that’s the most interesting thing about this story, the questions it raises about his motivation and if this was planned from the get go.

    Reply
  2. Dash Riptide

    the questions it raises about his motivation and if this was planned from the get go.

    Of course it was. He was trying to finesse a court case without actually doing anything that would constitute insubordination if he were on active duty. He wanted Uncle Sam to dance to his “clever” tune even though he had no skin in the game In his situation he had the right to withdraw his request to be deployed by an “illegitimate” military. No skin in the game means no justiciable case or controversy. Bad legal advice is worse than none at all. And now he gets to spend his days wondering when the other shoe will drop. After all, he is an officer who basically argued publicly that the entire chain of command of every branch of the military should be considered illegitimate until proven otherwise to his satisfaction. In his fringe echo chamber he’s no doubt considered a Great American. I pity him. He’s probably a decent, earnest person who has just seriously lost his way.

    Reply
  3. Upland

    Folks, let’s not tar the entire AJC reporting staff here, especially because the writer we’re talking about is a summer intern.

    Reply
    1. Dash Riptide

      Who imputed Knorr’s gaffe to anyone else? I’m not seeing it. The only wider implication I’m seeing here is that there is no gatekeeper at the AJC. It appears the reporters are essentially on their own. That’s how bloggers work, not newspapers.

      Reply
      1. Upland

        When the top of the story says “If this is true, then Lord help the AJC,” clearly the takeaway the author intends is that this incident is a sign the paper is falling apart. While the paper might be falling apart, it won’t be due to an intern’s ill-considered ProfNet posting.

        Reply
    2. CB Hackworth

      No, folks, let’s do tar the entire AJC reporting staff.

      You are who you work for. If you work for FOX News, you’re a part of FOX News. If you work for the National Enquirer, you’re a part of the National Enquirer.

      Yeah, I know there are a handful of good reporters left — like, say Rhonda Cook — who are putting in their time, waiting to retire… and I won’t put any of them on the spot by asking, but I doubt they would disagree with the overall assessment.

      The fact that the “reporter” who so mangled this article happens to be a summer intern is all the more of an indictment. What’s next? Will the newsroom find a homeless guy on Marietta Street with a sign that says “WILL WORK FOR FOOD” and take him up on the offer by giving him a writing assignment?

      Kind of reminds me of that ValuJet crash in the everglades. The airline never did accept responsibility. It just blamed an incompetent subcontractor — an incompetent subcontractor it hired, in order to save money.

      Reply
  4. Dash Riptide

    When the top of the story says “If this is true, then Lord help the AJC,” clearly the takeaway the author intends is that this incident is a sign the paper is falling apart.

    Now you’re changing your complaint entirely. And yeah, it is a sign of exactly that.

    While the paper might be falling apart, it won’t be due to an intern’s ill-considered ProfNet posting.

    That’s like saying that while we may indeed need to abandon this coal mine, it won’t be done in deference to the memory of one dead canary, as if that obvious point proves that the canary’s demise is irrelevant.

    Reply
  5. steve schwaid

    There are really few excuses for this. Except the reality is our business is changing around us probably faster than anyone of us imagined.

    It’s not an issue of whether local news stinks or not, it’s more an issue of do we understand where it’s going, what the consumer wants and are we doing our part in training the future? (It’s not about putting raw video on websites that viewers view as irrelevent.)

    Do you have interns in your newsrooms? If so, do you actively reach out to them and discuss the quality of their work, expectations and what they want to do?

    The scary part is how many live on facebook, myspace, send emails and think they’re doing real “intern work” like understanding/learning news judgment and news decision making.

    I understand geography is important – but the scary part is some interns think twitter is a real news service and wikipedia is a news source.

    Folks – as someone once said in a movie, we have a failure to communicate.

    Reply
    1. CB Hackworth

      All true.

      I just don’t want to read any more sanctimonious garbage in the AJC preaching about how they are still more relevant than the internet because of all the fact checking that the “legitimate” media does.

      Reply

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